Rise Women Rise: Victoria

Guest Story by Victoria

After reading Dr. Boyce Watkins blog that mentions the Dark Girls documentary film I was inspired to write a poem entitled “Black Rainbow”. Although there are only 255 words in the poem, I suspect that your 750 word limit for this section counts each alphabet. So I will type the poem below but part may be deleted so please contact me to see the entire 7 stanza poem that only has 4 lines in each stanza. Thank you.

BLACK RAINBOW

Copyright by Victoria Rowels ©2011

Young black slaves with beautiful dark skin,
Violated by white masters again and again.
They had white women to whom they were publicly wed.
But they preferred to rape black women in the slave shed.

A painful history we all want to forget,
But we can’t because of the children born of it.
Their hues range from black to white,
With hair sometimes straight and other times tight.

Evidence of a crime and justice never received.
Centuries have passed and yes, we still grieve.
But we must love the black rainbow that we have become.
We are the original hue-mans and should unite as one.

From the middle passage to every denied civil right,
We make the best of our trying plight.
But brainwashed to hate our African origin,
We began to hate our beautiful black skin.

From European standards of beauty to the paper bag test,
We have been encouraged to take part in a self-hate fest.
Now is the time to stop this genocidal game.
God loves us all and we should do the same.

A young black girl wanted to be fine.
She bought hazel contact lens and now she’s blind.
Some black women put glue in their hair,
To hold long straight weaves that blow in the air.

We shouldn’t do destructive things like that.
We are a beautiful people and that’s a fact.
Sisters and brothers we must love our natural state.
We must love the black rainbow and stop all the hate.

—-

The Dark Girls Movie- Rise  Women Rise Campaign seeks to share their stories of healing, empowerment, and triumph. We know this issue goes beyond the United States and Black people. This is for ALL women from around the world. If you have a written story or video, please submit here.

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8 Responses to Rise Women Rise: Victoria

  1. ebony says:

    So true loved the poem I have 2 dark skin girls and I always stress that they are smart pretty girls keep up the good work

    • Victoria Rowels says:

      Thank you Ebony for your compliment and encouragement. Hopefully by the time your daughters are adults, our people will love the Black rainbow.

  2. Ellen says:

    Lovely and powerful. An interesting history of the black woman in America.

  3. Karyn says:

    wow, what a wonderful poem! beautiful writing, I shared it on my blog 🙂 http://www.forbrowngirls.tumblr.com

  4. CremeBrulee says:

    I absolutely love the poem and have shared it with others. Keep up the wonderful and inspiring work Victoria.

  5. Joyce Redell Jones says:

    Africans are the inception of the entire human race…we are the dominant gene & ought to know that every race, culture of people have survived because of Black people’s genetic pool…so sad that we speak of racism as appauling, but we disdain our own brothers and sisters because of the ‘mixing’ pot! We are the original people!! And, what a beautiful people we are.

  6. Stephanie says:

    Very powerful. As a woman of color with a dark hue to my skin, I must say that I have never felt unworthy. However, I have been taunted because of the darkness of my skin. There were times when I was younger that I didn’t understand why people couldn’t see the me that I see when I look in the mirror. I didn’t see a ugly black girl, in fact I didn’t see anything wrong with the person looking back at me. I began to believe there must be something wrong with “those” people, the ones who couldn’t see the real me.
    My Black is Beautiful.

  7. Lorain says:

    Thanks Victoria, for the historically accurate root of this global predicament. Our story is a human story of survival within unspeakable crimes. As a RICHLY PIGMENTED woman, I see the seduction of security in escaping this 400 y/o target- while I did not choose to nullify my ancestral treasure, I cannot continue to deny that dark girls in the main succumb to the onslaught. I attended a HBCU and found another richly pigmented person who was determined to CELEBRATE his ancestral treasure of rich pigment and naturally ultra curly hair along with nascent intellect. I come by this route because my African-American parents, 4th generation at least, told me I was a beautiful descendant of the Watutsi. “They didn’t know that” one might say. But that armor, of rising from statuesque, founders of mankind, art, architecture, anatomy, etc, that armor left me singed but not burnt in the world outside my childhood home. I pray for every girl born darker than porcelain a ‘Dr.Yosef Ben-Jochannan’ type education. Where you see ‘dark’ I see rich pigment, where you see ‘nappy’, I see naturally curly, where you see ‘less’ I see more.

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